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Aug
02

Gestational Diabetes And Food: A Balancing Act

By regst
Gestational Diabetes And Food: A Balancing Act

Many women who never had diabetes are shocked when they are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Food takes on a whole new meaning. It is the stuff of life – but, could also trigger a diabetic coma if you treat your diet casually. The good news is that your gestational diabetes and food suspicions will end as soon as the baby pops out. The better news is that nine months or so is good time to learn better eating habits for your overall health, not just your blood sugar levels. Pay Attention To Your Carbs With gestational diabetes and food, counting your daily intake of carbohydrates is key. Carbohydrates converts to glucose (blood sugar), which is what you will watching like a hawk. Carbohydrates effects your blood sugar and monitoring your blood sugar helps you with monitoring your carbohydrates. It might seem daunting at first, but you’ll get the hang of managing gestational diabetes with food. You want to make sure your carbs are spread out throughout your day. This is also true of your calories. With a growing baby, you need to eat about 300 extra calories per day. That means you will be eating about 2200 calories per day. Check with your doctor to be sure. You need to have five or six small meals rather than three large ones. You also need to cut out fatty meats, high fat snacks and lots of processed or fast food. A good idea is to fill a third of your plate with protein, a third with carbohydrates and another third with fruits and vegetables. Your Relationship With Food A major gestational diabetes risk is if you are overweight and over 25 when you get pregnant. This means you have probably been having some food issues and have been trying to have a better relationship with food, anyway. Well, gestational diabetes will force you to eat better. This will help not only your growing baby’s health and your blood sugar, but your joints, your heart and many other health conditions. With gestational diabetes, food intake alone will often not be enough to be sure that you and your baby get through the pregnancy okay. You also need to go to all of your check ups, learn to monitor your blood sugar, exercise regularly and take any medication prescribed. Please don’t do any fad diets, colon cleansings, fastings or any drastic measures like that. Your body will not be able to handle the shock.

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Help answer the question about news diabetes

What is a good diet when you have a diabetes (high blood sugar)?
I just got news that I have diabetes. I do not have really high blood sugar when I have to use insulin, but the doctor said I definitely need to go on a diet. Would you be kind to advise me on a good diet, please?

About Author

Nupur Das, an ardent writer is a Masters in English.She has many short stories to her credit and now given her attention to article writing.Please visit my blog http://avoid-diabetes.blogspot.com for more information.

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Gestational Diabetes And Food: A Balancing Act

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Categories : Diabetes-News

7 Comments

1

He's an answer I did not copy and paste from the Internet.

Your children will have a higher risk or Type II diabetes because it is in their family. But it can be avoided by them if they maintain healthy eating habits and stay active. They should also avoid excessive drinking later in life. They should not be at risk now unless they are obese. Type II is on the rise with our youth because of the electronic babysitter and over indulgence of junk food and soda. If you teach your children proper eating habits now they can carry that through as adults and they will be fine. Type II runs in my family – 2 uncles and my grandfather. As long as the rest of us stay active and eat healthy we will be fine.

Good luck to you and your family.

2

This is an amazing demonstration. I am drinking the water myself and feel like a new man. You can visit any of my sites and see more information about this.
Thanks for posting it.

3

A quick look at the latest treatment on Diabetes treatment and causes.

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/2645319/latest_news_on_diabetes_treatments/

4

At 40 I can’t believe the energy I now have drinking 1-1.5 gals per day of micro water and my acid reflux is gone too. I work in the heat all day and I can come home now after 8 hrs in the heat and do more work at home…It’s great stuff!!

5

It depends what type you are.

6

I initially blamed myself for the diagnosis as well and that is normal means of grieving. Just because you've been diagnosed as Type 2 doesn't mean it is totally your fault, you may of been genetically pre-disposed to develop diabetes. Being Type1, I would prefer Type 2 over Type 1. Though Type 2 is more attributed to ones life style, proper exercise and diet may allow one to reduce their dependency for medication. To an extent that can be done with Type 1, but the pancreas may be on its death bed, which will eventually require full dependence on insulin. Either way, had I not been diagnosed, I wouldn't be taking care my self in the manner I currently am. I do my carb-counting for each meal, exercise almost everyday, check my feet and currently have an A1C of 5.5. It did take motivation and it is so worth it compared to the complications that we face.

Remember, it is not about being a perfectionist, perfection only lasts a moment. Diabetes, lasts a life time and is therefore a marathon.

7

they should teach about this in skl

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